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GoodWeave certifies 3 more rug importers as child-labor-free

Washington - GoodWeave, an organization working to end child labor in the hand-made rug industry, announced that three more U.S. rug companies have joined its certification program, committing to a child-labor-free supply chain.

Caccese Collection, Doug and Gene Meyer Studio, and Kumari Rugs have joined the program, bringing to 90 the number of North American importers licensed by GoodWeave USA.

To ensure licensed importers adhere to its certification conditions, GoodWeave conducts unannounced inspections of importers' looms. Each company's licensing fees support GoodWeave's work to rescue, rehabilitate and educate former child weavers and other at-risk children in weaving communities in India, Nepal and Afghanistan. Every certified rug receives a numbered label traceable to the inspected loom.

"We're proud of all the companies that have stepped forward to take a stand for children in weaving communities," said Nina Smith, executive director of GoodWeave USA. "They make it easier for consumers to find rugs they can buy with a clear conscience and bring us closer to our vision of a child-labor-free industry."

Based in New York, Caccese Collection designs custom, hand-knotted carpets incorporating natural fibers like bamboo, hemp, nettle and jute, in addition to wool and silk.

Doug and Gene Meyer Studio is also based in New York and imports rugs designed by the Meyer brothers.

Kumari Rugs, headquartered in Bowling Green, Ky., creates hand-knotted rugs that fuse elements of founder Raja Bhattacharya's native Nepalese culture with that of his adopted home in the South. Made in Nepal from Kentucky-raised alpaca and Himalayan wool, Kumari's rugs feature designs created in partnership with the Kentucky Arts Council.

Nearly eight million GoodWeave certified rugs have been sold worldwide.

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